Reservist

ISS2 2018

Reservist Magazine is the award-winning official publication of the United States Coast Guard Reserve. Quarterly issues include news and feature articles about the men and women who comprise America's premier national maritime safety and security

Issue link: https://uscgreservist.epubxp.com/i/988565

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 12 of 51

continuously deployed to GTMO to provide waterside security at the detention facility located at the base. Over the past year, the Coast Guard has assumed increased responsibility for shore side security as well. Support of this enhanced mission requirement was no small feat as it represented a significant departure from the mission set we have become accustomed to supporting. Through some extremely hard work, we were able to build the force required to sustain this requirement into the future. Even with these many different competing requirements, the Reserve was able to quickly and completely provide all required resources. While this is great news, I can't help but wonder: is this because of the systems we have in place or in spite of them? Is success enough? The current resource environment has led us to make some very difficult choices over the past five years. We have had to sacrifice end strength and discretionary expenses to retain as much of our core strength and capability as possible. As a result, our Reserve force can no longer serve as an "All Threats, All Hazards" workforce. In February of last year, we released our very first Reserve Mission and Vision statements in order to put a distinct point on how we should prioritize our time and resources. I want to ensure that senior leadership understands the training needs in order to prioritize our limited resources. We are also working diligently to integrate the Reserve Component Force Planning System with the emerging Force Planning Construct that will take a holistic view of the personnel requirements necessary to execute daily steady-state missions and meet contingency requirements into the future. This will require the operational and support program managers at Coast Guard Headquarters to take ownership of full-scope personnel requirements in order to better manage operational risk. Strategic priorities In light of our current budgetary and personnel situation, we must take stock of where we are, understand how we got here and set strategic priorities to guide us into the future. To this end, we will focus our attention over the next few years on "Getting the Organization Right," "Getting the Force Right" and "Building Leadership for the Reserve." Getting the organization right Integration of Active and Reserve Component operations has been extremely valuable to the Coast Guard since the mid- 1990's. Integration reduced organizational overhead and placed responsibility for the development and readiness for all Coast Guard personnel squarely on the shoulders of field commanders. That said, integration did not go far enough, leaving a disjointed administrative and resource environment, which does not effectively tie Area contingency response requirements with the ability of Headquarters capability managers to provide the right workforce with the right training at the right time. The Office of Reserve Affairs will work closely with their partners in the Deputy Commandant for Operations (DCO) and the Deputy Commandant for Mission Support (DCMS) to improve alignment and drive synergies in this area through the creation of a Reserve Resource Council. This will bring greater transparency on the impact of DCMS resource decisions to DCO programs than ever before. Getting the force right Efforts to establish clearer mobilization and force requirements for the Reserve will continue to evolve, providing a better sense of the skills required within the Reserve. We will take this information and partner with the Areas, DCO, DCMS and the Force Readiness Command to guide geographically coherent training and recruiting strategies to restore Reserve Sector Miami crew readies a boom at the Port of Miami as part of an Incident Command System (ICS) oil spill exercise at the Port of Miami Jan. 20-21. Photo by Cmdr. Natalie Murphy Issue 2 • 2018 � RESERVIST 11

Articles in this issue

Archives of this issue

view archives of Reservist - ISS2 2018